You are here: Home / News / Bilingualism: Changing the architecture of your brain

Bilingualism: Changing the architecture of your brain

Distinguished Professor of Psychology Judith Kroll delivers presentation at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C.

Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Linguistics, and Women's Studies and Director of the Center for Language Science Judith Kroll delivered a presentation on bilingualism at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington, D.C. Professor Kroll's presentation discussed the ways bilinguals learn and regulate multiple languages and how these processes alter brain structures. 

As summarized by Penn State News:

Both languages are active at all times in bilinguals, meaning the individuals cannot easily turn off either language and the languages are in competition with one another. In turn this causes bilinguals to juggle the two languages, reshaping the network in the brain that supports each.

"The consequences of bilingualism are not limited to language but reflect a reorganization of brain networks that hold implications for the ways in which bilinguals negotiate cognitive competition more generally," said Kroll.

For more, check out coverage of Dr. Kroll's work at:

Return to Top