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Graduate Program Brochure

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General Information

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Graduate study in psychology at Penn State is characterized by highly flexible, individualized programs leading to the Ph.D. in psychology. Each student is associated with one of the five program areas offered in the department. These programs are: Clinical (including Adult and Child-Clinical); Cognitive; Developmental; Industrial/ Organizational; and Social. Each of these areas is described more fully in the attached material. The program descriptions include listings of the relevant graduate faculty at the University Park campus. Penn State faculty at lo-cations other than University Park are also members of the Department of Psychology and are available to supervise graduate students' work. Their research interests are described in the Synopsis of Faculty Research Interests. Faculty with emeritus, joint, adjunct, and affiliate ap-pointments provide additional resources.

To be considered for admission, applicants must select one of the five program areas. Once a student is admitted to a program area, it is possible to change areas only with faculty approval of the involved areas. The details of a student's program are formulated on an individual basis with a faculty adviser. Each student organizes his or her work into one major and one minor ar-ea. The major is selected from among the five specialty areas of the department listed above. The minor may be fulfilled within the department by work in the four remaining areas of psychol-ogy or by satisfying minor requirements of any other division of the University entirely outside the department (e.g., statistics, computer science, special education, sociology, biology).

Financial Support

Many graduate students in psychology are supported by half-time departmental assistantships that include a stipend and remission of tuition, permit 9–12 credits of course work each semes-ter, and require twenty hours of work per week. Support is also provided by a variety of training grants, individual faculty members' research grants, and various University-wide funds.

Application Deadline and Additional Information

Additional information may be obtained from:

, Administrative Support Assistant (sbg4@psu.edu)
Department of Psychology
The Pennsylvania State University
125A Moore Building
University Park, PA 16802.
Ph: 814-863-1721
http://psych.la.psu.edu

Completed applications must be received by:
DECEMBER 1, 2014, for Clinical, Cognitive, Developmental, I/O, and Social Psychology

Clinical Psychology

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Program Description

The major overall goal of the clinical program is to train graduate students for future careers that involve both research and clinical activities performed in an integrated fashion. Thus, it is our primary goal to train students for research-oriented careers including universities, medical schools, and settings, which integrate research and evaluation along with professional services. Consequently, there is a strong em-phasis on the clinical science of psychology in our program. It is the strong belief of the faculty that excel-lence in this domain is best provided by superior training in both the scientific methods and clinical as-sessment and intervention. It should be noted that those students whose career goal is full-time private practice without a significant research commitment will find our program inappropriate for their needs.

In addition to other regular course work, students are expected to engage in both clinical practica and research throughout their graduate training. Students generally complete course work during their first three years, and complete their comprehensive exam in the fourth year, and a dissertation in the fifth year. An additional year is devoted to a pre-doctoral internship.

Our program is an APA-accredited1 doctoral program in clinical psychology and designed for students to be qualified for licensure in most states. The program, formulated with one's major professor, includes assessment, psychotherapy, personality, research design, psychopathology, two statistics courses, one course in biological bases of behavior, one course in cognitive-affective bases of behavior, one course in social bases of behavior, at least one course in human development and continuing assignment to practica in the departmental Psychological Clinic. Several other clinical courses and seminars, focused on the interest areas of the faculty, are offered regularly. Additional information about the program may be found in a separate brochure on clinical psychology.

Core Faculty at University Park

Peter A. Arnett, Ph.D., 1992, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Clinical neuropsychology, neuropsychological dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) and sports-related mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI); neuropsychological correlates of secondary factors (e.g., depression, anxiety, motivation, etc.) in these neurological conditions; contributors to and conse-quences of depression and other forms of psychopathology in MS.

Sandra T. Azar, Ph.D., 1984, University of Rochester

Child clinical psychology and family processes and risk issues. Her work focuses on maternal be-havior, child abuse, gender and aggression; and legal issues affecting families (e.g., definitions of parental competence for custody evaluations; racial, ethnic, and class bias in legal treatment of fami-lies).

Karen Linn Bierman, Ph.D., 1981, University of Denver

Child clinical psychology; social adjustment, social skills training, prevention, and early inter-vention of childhood aggression.

Louis G. Castonguay, Ph.D., 1992, State University of New York at Stony Brook

Psychotherapy process and outcome; depression, anxiety, and eating disorders; psychotherapy in-tegration.

Pamela M. Cole, Ph.D., 1980, The Pennsylvania State University

Child clinical psychology; early childhood predictors of psychopathology, development of emotion regulation, cross-cultural differences in emotional development psychopathology.

Frank G. Hillary, Ph.D., 2000, Drexel University

Adult neuropsychology, mechanisms of neural plasticity following brain injury and dis-ease. Neuroimaging techniques including magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission to-mography, and near infrared spectroscopy.

Cynthia L. Huang-Pollock, Ph.D., 2003, Michigan State University

Child clinical psychology; neurocognitive deficits associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Dis-order (ADHD). Neuropsychological performance as affected by motivation, reward, and timing defi-cits in children with and without ADHD.

Kenneth N. Levy, Ph.D., 1999, City University of New York

Clinical psychology interests bridging the areas of social, personality, and developmental psycholo-gy. Attachment theory, emotion regulation, personality disorders, and psychotherapy process and outcome.

Amy D. Marshall, Ph.D., 2004, Indiana University

Clinical psychology, social information processing deficits associated with perpetration of intimate partner violence, methods of studying emotion, recognition, posttraumatic stress disorder.

Ginger A. Moore, Ph.D., 2000, University of Pittsburgh

Child clinical psychology; infant emotion development in high-risk social contexts, empathy, parental psychopathology, marital conflict and domestic violence, and maternal incarceration. Clinical inter-ests include mother-infant interaction therapy to promote optimal development of infant emotion reg-ulation, treatment of children exposed to trauma, and family systems and emotions-focused therapy approaches.

Michelle G. Newman, Ph.D., 1992, State University of New York at Stony Brook

Etiology, classification, health implications, group, and individual psychotherapy of anxiety disorders.

Aaron Pincus, Ph.D., 1992, University of British Columbia, Canada

Personality structure and assessment, personality factors in psychopathology, assessment and treatment of personality disorders, group psychotherapy.

Brian A. Rabian, Ph.D., 1992, George Washington University

Child anxiety, identification of early risk factors for the development of psychopathology in children.

William J. Ray, Ph.D., 1971, Vanderbilt University

Psychophysiological indicants of emotional and cognitive behavior with emphasis on EEG and individual differences, anxiety, dissociation, chaos models.

José A. Soto, Ph.D., 2004, University of California, Berkeley

Influence of culture on psychological and physiological processes. Much of his work has centered on understanding the role that culture plays in emotional functioning. How culture and ethnic back-ground affect: 1) how we experience and express emotions and 2) how accurate we are in inferring the emotions of others.

Martha Wadsworth, Ph.D., 2001, University of Vermont

Child Clinical psychology, research on the role of stress and copying processes in developmental
psychopathology. She focuses on children at elevated risk for problems resulting from family adversity, especially poverty.

Stephen Wilson, Ph.D., 2008, University of Pittsburgh

Adult Clinical, research in addictive behavior, with a specific focus on cigarette smoking. Interdisci-plinary approach that integrates theory and methods from traditional behavioral addiction research with those derived from the affective, cognitive and social neurosciences.

Other Faculty and Programs Affiliated with Clinical:

Other members of the psychology department at University Park with interests in clinical psychology in-clude: Frederick Brown (health psychology), Melvin Mark (effects of mood state).

The principal practicum training agency in the program is the Psychological Clinic, a comprehensive men-tal health center for the University community and for surrounding central Pennsylvania communities. The varied psychological services include adult and child assessment; consultation with parents, schools, and other public officials; individual and group psychotherapy; child play therapy; marital and family counsel-ing; behavior modification for children and adults; and community mental health consultation. Mental health facilities of surrounding communities provide additional practicum sites.

1Questions related to the program’s accredited status should be directed to the Commission on Accreditation:
Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 1st Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 336-5979 / E-mail: apaaccred@apa.org
Web: www.apa.org/ed/accreditation

Cognitive Psychology

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Program Description

The Cognitive Psychology program at Penn State emphasizes research and theory in a variety of areas of cognitive psychology and human performance. All cognitive students' programs emphasize basic theo-retical issues and research methodologies in cognitive psychology, but individual programs vary widely depending upon the student's substantive interest. As in the other programs in the department, the stu-dent works with his or her faculty adviser to develop an individualized program of major and minor areas. Faculty and students in the cognitive area participate in a weekly "bag lunch" that provides opportunities to discuss ongoing research projects and issues. Graduates of the program are prepared to enter re-search and teaching positions in university or college settings, or to work in applied research organizations.

Students in the Cognitive Psychology program may choose elective courses from, or minor in, areas such as linguistics, computer science, kinesiology (motor control), and neuroscience (SCAN). The College of Medicine at the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA, the School of Information Sciences and Technology and the Center for Language Acquisition on the University Park campus provide addi-tional resources for students interested in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience. More than fifty faculty members in other departments of the University also have interests in cognitive research that complement those of the cognitive faculty and students, providing a broad range of interdisciplinary per-spectives.

Core Faculty at University Park - Cognition and Human Performance

Frederick M. Brown, Ph.D., 1971, University of Virginia

Health psychology, influence of cyclic environment and internal organismic rhythms on behavior.

Richard A. Carlson, Ph.D., 1984, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Consciousness, cognitive skill, working memory in reasoning and skill acquisition, spatial cog-nition.

Nancy Dennis, Ph.D., 2004, The Catholic University of America

Research focuses on elucidating the cognitive and neural mechanisms that support learning and memory in young and older adults.

Rick O. Gilmore, Ph.D., 1997, Carnegie-Mellon University

Developmental cognitive neuroscience; neural processes of spatial perception, action, and memory; computational models of perceptual, cognitive, and motor development.

Ping Li, Ph.D., 1990, Leiden University

Research is aimed to understanding the relationships among language, brain, and culture.

Judith F. Kroll, Ph.D., 1977, Brandeis University

Language and memory, bilingualism, second language acquisition, visual cognition.

David A. Rosenbaum, Ph.D., 1977, Stanford University

Cognitive substrates of skilled performance, human motor control, computer modeling.

Daniel J. Weiss, Ph.D., 2000, Harvard University

Comparative approach to cognitive mechanisms underlying language acquisition. Statistical learn-ing mechanisms that have been implicated in the learning of phonetic categories, as well as word segmentation and rule-learning.

Brad Wyble, Ph.D., 2003, Harvard University

Visual cognition with an emphasis on exploring how a visual stimulus becomes a consciously ac cessible representation. His work incorporates theories of temporal attention and consolidation of memory representation as well as the capture of attention by task relevant stimuli.

Janet G. van Hell, Ph. D., 1998, University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands)

Second language and bilingualism, language development in children with typical or atypical lan-guage development, code-switching, bimodal bilingualism, cognitive neuroscience of language processing.

Other Faculty and Programs Affiliated with Cognitive:

Other faculty at University Park (in psychology, except as noted) who are affiliated with the cognitive pro-gram include:; Paola Dussias (Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese; psycholinguistics, eye movements in reading); Karen Gasper (social; affect and information processing); Rick Jacobs (industrial/organizational; models of information processing/decision making); Lynn Liben (developmental; spatial cognition, graphic representation); Mark Latash (kinesiology; neurophysiology of movement); Keith Nel-son (developmental; theories of developmental change, language acquisition); Karl Newell (kinesiology; motor learning and development); William Ray (clinical; psychophysiological relationship of emotional and cognitive behavior); Frank Ritter (School of Information Sciences and Technology; cognitive modeling within a unified theory of cognition); Robert Sainburg (kinesiology; neural mechanisms of motor control); Dagmar Sternad (kinesiology; dynamical systems analysis of movement); and Janet Swim (social; cogni-tive biases in information processing). Psychology faculty at other Penn State campuses with interests in cognitive psychology include: William R. Balch (Altoona; perception of melody, modality-specific memory codes); Mark Casteel (York; reading and inference in children); and Valerie Stratton (Altoona; effects of music on mood and behavior).

Developmental Pyschology

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Program Description

The doctoral program in Developmental Psychology at Penn State offers a flexible program de-signed to provide students with a broad theoretical and empirical background in developmental psychology coupled with expertise in one or more areas of specialization. Specialty areas may concern basic research questions in cognitive or social development, and/or issues related to the application of developmental psychology to various settings. These goals are met through course work, research projects, and practicum experiences. Depending upon the individual stu-dent's particular program of study, graduates may be employed in academic departments, re-search institutes, governmental agencies, or various service-delivery settings. The program fac-ulty includes both a core developmental faculty group as well as a larger Developmental Pro-gram Network (DPN) that involves faculty affiliated with other areas of the Psychology Depart-ment who are interested in developmental phenomena. DPN faculty are involved in Develop-mental Proseminar, research supervision, and the developmental graduate curriculum.

Core Faculty at University Park

Sheri A. Berenbaum, Ph.D., 1977, University of California, Berkeley

Social and cognitive development, primarily from a neuroscience perspective. Prenatal sex hormone effects on gender development, genetic influences on pubertal development and on the association between pubertal timing and behavior, and the neural substrates of individual differences in cognitive abilities.

Kristin A. Buss, Ph.D., 2000, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Social and emotional development, temperament, emotion regulation, the role of physiology in indi-vidual differences in emotions and temperament, fearful temperament and adjustment.

Rick O. Gilmore, Ph.D., 1997, Carnegie-Mellon University

Developmental cognitive neuroscience; neural processes of spatial perception, action, and memory; computational models of perceptual, cognitive, and motor development.

Lynn S. Liben, Ph.D., 1972, The University of Michigan

Representational development, including spatial and graphic representations and their role in science and art education; development of social stereotypes and prejudice, with a particular emphasis on gender stereotyping and its consequences.

Jenae Neiderhiser, Ph. D., 1994, The Pennsylvania State University

Understanding the interplay between genes and environment throughout the lifespan.

Keith E. Nelson, Ph.D., 1970, Yale University

Language development, art, plans, and memory and their interrelations across the lifespan.

Koraly Perez-Edgar, Ph.D., 2001, Harvard University

Temperament: Attention mechanisms that shape social and emotional development, Psy-chophysiological and neural correlates of emotion and attention (EEG, ERP, fMRI).

Suzy Scherf, Ph.D., 2003, University of Pittsburgh

Developmental psychology, developmental cognitive neuroscience, developmental neu-roimaging (fMRI, DTI), face processing, autism, vision science, role of pubertal develop-ment in re-organizing neural circuitry supporting social-information processing in adoles-cence.

Janet G. van Hell, Ph.D., 1998, University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands)

Second language learning and bilingualism, language development in children with typi-cal or atypical language development, code-switching, bimodal bilingualism, cognitive neuroscience of language processing.

Dawn P. Witherspoon, Ph.D., 2008, New York University

Focuses on neighborhood, school, and family factors that affect adolescents’ socioemotional and academic adjustment.

Other Faculty and Programs Affiliated with Developmental:

Other members of the psychology department at University Park who participate in the Develop-mental Program Network include: Karen Linn Bierman (social-emotional development); Richard Carlson (acquisition of problem solving skills); Pamela Cole (developmental psychopathology, development of expressive control, cross-cultural differences in emotion-context and reality-appearance distinction understanding); Judith Kroll (language learning, including how acquisi-tion history affects language representation in bilinguals); Janet Swim (gender stereotyping, ra-cial identity); Theresa Vescio (stereotyping and prejudice); Daniel Weiss (cognitive mechanisms underlying language acquisition, including comparative work on infant and adult humans and non-human primates). Students in the program also work with developmental psychologists whose primary affiliations are in other divisions of the University such as the College of Health and Human Development and the College of Education.

The Child Study Center (CSC) at Penn State is dedicated to promoting children's development through research and practice. The CSC is a research and training center whose focus is to gain knowledge about children's typical and atypical development. It currently houses several NIH- and NSF-funded research projects, an NIH training program, and the Child and Adolescent Service of the Psychological Clinic. The CSC provides interview rooms, video labs, and other facilities related to research and clinical work with infants, children, and families. In addition, connections with the Department of Human Development and Family Studies (in the College of Health and Human Development) and the Prevention Research Center provide additional op-portunities for collaborative work. Infant, toddler, and preschool programs on campus as well as local school districts also provide practicum and research settings.

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

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Program Description

The program in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Penn State combines course work, research, and supervised practical experience to prepare students for positions in a variety of industrial, govern-mental, consulting, and academic settings. Students participate in seminar topics such as personnel se-lection, industrial training, and social-industrial psychology. In addition to conducting research for their master's theses and doctoral dissertations, students participate in practica that provide the opportunity to work on real-world problems in industrial and government organizations. Teams of I/O graduate students, under faculty supervision, plan and conduct research requested by firms and governmental agencies. In addition to providing practicum opportunities, these organizations contribute to the graduate program fi-nancially, helping to support convention travel, thesis and dissertation research, summer employment, etc. Students are encouraged to combine their work in the I/O program with training in other areas of psy-chology and related disciplines, including social psychology, organizational behavior, and statistics and methodology.

Core Faculty at University Park

James L. Farr, Ph.D., 1971, University of Maryland

Traditional areas of personnel psychology such as selection, performance appraisal, and train-ing; impact of reward systems on work motivation and career transitions.

Alicia A. Grandey, Ph.D., 1999, Colorado State University

Stress and well-being of employees, work-family conflict and family-friendly policies, and the emo-tional labor of customer service employees.

Sam Hunter, Ph.D., 2007, University of Oklahoma

Leadership, particularly pragmatic leadership as well as “darker” leader behaviors, such as leader errors and ideologically-based violent acts. Second area of interest is innovation and innovation management with emphasis on multi-level issues

Rick R. Jacobs, Ph.D., 1978, University of California, Berkeley

Human resources systems including selection, performance management, and cost-benefit evaluations; individual and organizational perspectives on safety; development of analyses of performance.

Kisha S. Jones, Ph.D., 2013, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research seeks to idientify how diversity can be increased and managed in organizations by understanding the ways that personal characteristics of individuals (e.g., knowledge, skills, abil-ities, vocational interests, race/ethnicity, gender, etc.) influence their attraction to, interesting in, and selection of jobs.

James M. LeBreton, Ph.D., 2002, University of Tennessee

Research program examines the relationships between personality, specifically the implicit or unconscious side of personality and behavior in organizations. Also, interested in the develop-ment and application of new statistics designed to improve the decisions made by organization-al scholars.

Songqi Liu, Ph.D., 2011, University of Maryland

Research is broadly focused on employee adjustment and adaptation processes in the workplace.

Susan Mohammed, Ph.D., 1995, The Ohio State University

Team cognition, team composition/diversity, temporal issues in teams, group decision making.

Other Faculty and Programs Affiliated with I/O:

Other members of the psychology department faculty at University Park with interests in industrial/organizational psychology include: Melvin Mark (equity and resource allocations, program evaluation in organizations); Michelle Newman (cost-benefit models of therapeutic interventions for anxiety); Janet Swim (biases in performance evaluations); and Teresa Vescio (stereotyping, leadership, and diversity in organizations). In addition, there is close interaction with industrial psychologists and other organizational scientists in The Mary Jean and Frank P. Smeal College of Business Administration and the School of Information Sciences and Technology.

Social Psychology

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Program Description

The Social Psychology program at Penn State is designed to train our students to conduct theo-retically-grounded, methodologically sound social psychology research that promotes positive social change. Strengths of our program are our focus on advancing research in a socially con-scious manner and our promotion of cross-disciplinary collaboration. Our research emphases are (1) stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination and (2) affect and emotion, with research on gender and the self overlapping both of these areas. Students obtain research experience through collaboration with faculty and through the development of their own empirical research. Each student selects a program of study in consultation with an advisory committee of her or his own choosing. Faculty and students in social psychology meet weekly to discuss on-going re-search projects. Graduates are trained to teach and to conduct research in academic and ap-plied settings. Core course work is designed to introduce students to significant topic areas within social psychology, to provide training in a range of research methods and statistical tech-niques, and to promote acquisition of advanced research and writing skills. Additional courses provide in-depth coverage of specialty areas within social psychology. See http://psych.la.psu.edu/socialarea/index.html for further information.

Core Faculty at University Park

Reginald B. Adams, Jr., Ph.D., 2002, Dartmouth College

Detection of mental and emotional states through nonverbal cues (e.g. eye gaze), social group memberships (e.g., gender and race), and facial appearance; application of visual cognition and af-fective neuroscience to address social perception.

Karen Gasper, Ph.D., 1999, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Affect and social cognition, affect regulation, motivation and goals, individual and situational differ-ences in emotional understanding and experience.

Melvin Mark, Ph.D., 1979, Northwestern University

Applied social psychology, program evaluation and policy research, perceived justice, mood and social judgments.

Stephanie Shields, Ph.D., 1976, The Pennsylvania State University

Human emotion, especially beliefs about emotion, physiological correlates of emotion, and the rela-tion between "felt" emotion and emotion as a cultural construct; gender theory; women in psycholo-gy.

Janet K. Swim, Ph.D., 1988, University of Minnesota

Sexism and heterosexism, perceptions and meta-perceptions of prejudice, interpersonal and in-trapersonal goals and coping with discrimination, race/ethnic socialization, race/ethnic identity.

Theresa K. Vescio, Ph.D., 1996, University of Kansas

Stereotyping, prejudice, power, intergroup attribution, self-categorization, coping with discrimination.

Other Faculty and Programs Affiliated with Social:

Other members of the psychology department at University Park with interests in social psy-chology include, but are not limited to: Sheri Berenbaum (social and cognitive development, primarily from a neuroscience perspective), Pamela Cole (emotion regulation), Alicia A. Grandey (stress and emotions), Ken Levy (social, personality, and developmental psycholo-gy), Lynn Liben (cognitive and social development including development of gender and racial stereotypes); Susan Mohammed (group/team dynamics and decision making,). In addition, faculty in other departments at University Park have interest in social psychological research including Michael Hecht, Department of Communication Arts and Sciences (communication), Phyllis Mansfield (women’s studies and health education), Wayne Osgood and Barry Ruback (crime, law and justice); and Marylee Taylor (sociology). Psychology faculty at other PSU loca-tions whose core area is social psychology include: Peter Crabb (technology and social behav-ior); Mary Gergen (social constructionism, gender issues); John Johnson (personality); and Margaret Signorella (gender schemata, sex differences in cognitive ability).

Specialization in Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

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Description

The specialization in cognitive and affective neuroscience is a department-wide effort to integrate the study of brain and behavior by infusing neuroscience throughout the traditional areas of psychology. This approach recognizes the rapidly growing connections between psychology and neuroscience. Stu-dents will be admitted to one of the traditional substantive areas of the psychology department—clinical (child or adult), cognitive, developmental, industrial-organizational, or social psychology—and augment their work in that area with coursework and research using a variety of physiological methods.

Modern approaches to brain-behavior research are interdisciplinary, and the specialization in cognitive and affective neuroscience offers training that reflects this vibrant dynamic. Students taking part in the specialization will have the opportunity to pursue cross-disciplinary work with faculty in other areas of the psychology department and in other departments of the university, including biology, kinesiology, biobehavioral health, and human development. In addition, students can take advantage of university-wide neuroscience activities, both here in University Park and at the College of Medicine in Hershey.

As with the other programs in the department, students will work with one or more faculty advisors to develop an individualized program of study. Faculty and students taking part in the specialization will also participate in a bi-weekly seminar that provides opportunities to discuss ongoing research. Gradu-ates of the program will be prepared to enter research and teaching positions in university or college settings, or to work in applied research organizations.

Participating faculty

Reginald B. Adams, Jr., Ph.D., 2002, Dartmouth College

Detection of mental and emotional states through nonverbal cues (e.g. eye gaze), social group memberships (e.g., gender and race), and facial appearance; application of visual cognition and affective neuroscience to address social perception.

Peter A. Arnett, Ph.D., 1992, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Clinical neuropsychology, neuropsychological dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) and sports- related mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI); neuropsychological correlates of secondary factors (e.g., depression, anxiety, motivation, etc.) in these neurological conditions; contributors to and consequences of depression and other forms of psychopathology in MS.

Sheri A. Berenbaum, Ph.D., 1977, University of California, Berkeley

Social and cognitive development, primarily from a neuroscience perspective. Prenatal sex hor-mone effects on gender development, genetic influences on pubertal development and on the as-sociation between pubertal timing and behavior, and the neural substrates of individual differences in cognitive abilities.

Frederick M. Brown, Ph.D., 1971, University of Virginia

Health psychology, influence of cyclic environment and internal organismic rhythms on behavior.

Kristin A. Buss, Ph.D., 2000, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Social and emotional development, temperament, emotion regulation, the role of physiology in indi-vidual differences in emotions and temperament, fearful temperament and adjustment.

Theresa K. Vescio, Ph.D., 1996, University of Kansas

Stereotyping, prejudice, intergroup attribution, and self-categorization.

Daniel J. Weiss, Ph.D., 2000, Harvard University

Comparative approach to cognitive mechanisms underlying language acquisition. Statistical learning mechanisms that have been implicated in the learning of phonetic categories, as well as word segmentation and rule-learning.

Stephen Wilson, Ph.D., 2008, University of Pittsburgh

Addictive behavior, with a specific focus on cigarette smoking. Interdisciplinary approach that inte-grates theory and methods from traditional behavioral addiction research with those derived from the affective, cognitive and social neurosciences.

Richard A. Carlson, Ph.D., 1984, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Consciousness, cognitive skill, working memory in reasoning and skill acquisition, spatial cognition.

Pamela M. Cole, Ph.D., 1980, The Pennsylvania State University

Child clinical psychology, early childhood predictors of psychopathology, development of emotion regulation, cross-cultural differences in emotional development psychopathology.

Nancy Dennis, Ph.D., 2004, The Catholic University of America

Research focuses on elucidating the cognitive and neural mechanisms that support learning and memory in young and older adults.

Karen Gasper, Ph.D., 1999, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Affect and social cognition, affect regulation, motivation and goals, individual and situational differ-ences in emotional understanding and experience.

Rick O. Gilmore, Ph.D., 1997, Carnegie-Mellon University

Developmental cognitive neuroscience; neural processes of spatial perception, action, and memory; computational models of perceptual, cognitive, and motor development.

Frank G. Hillary, Ph.D., 2000, Drexel University

Adult neuropsychology. Mechanisms of neural plasticity following brain injury and disease.

Cynthia L. Huang-Pollock, Ph.D., 2003, Michigan State University

Child clinical psychology; neurocognitive deficits associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Neuropsychological performance as affected by motivation, reward, and timing deficits in children with and without ADHD.

Judith F. Kroll, Ph.D., 1977, Brandeis University

Language and memory, bilingualism, second language acquisition, visual cognition.

Ping Li, Ph.D., 1990, Leiden University

Research is aimed to understanding the relationships among language, brain, and culture.

Keith E. Nelson, Ph.D., 1970, Yale University

Language development, art, plans, and memory and their interrelations across the lifespan.

William J. Ray, Ph.D., 1971, Vanderbilt University

Psychophysiological indicants of emotional and cognitive behavior with emphasis on EEG and individual differences, anxiety, dissociation, chaos models.

David A. Rosenbaum, Ph.D., 1977, Stanford University

Cognitive substrates of skilled performance, human motor control, computer modeling.

Stephanie Shields, Ph.D., 1976, The Pennsylvania State University

Human emotion, especially beliefs about emotion, physiological correlates of emotion, and the rela-tion between "felt" emotion and emotion as a cultural construct; gender theory; women in psycholo-gy.

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